» The Problem The Fix The Petition
Welcome to Let's Fix CANCON. This campaign is committed to encouraging the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to modernize Canadian Content (CANCON) regulations placed on Canadian terrestrial radio broadcasters (AM/FM).

Our goal is to create incentives within CANCON that encourage Canadian radio stations to play more new and developing Canadian artists.

Supporters of this campaign believe that we can improve Canadian radio, improve the Canadian music industry and create a stronger artist development system, all with some simple changes to CANCON.
Frankly, Avril Lavigne doesn't need government legislation to receive radio airplay in Canada or anywhere else in the world.  The songs of Sarah McLachlan, Nickelback and Celine Dion are heard in many countries around the world and will be played on our airwaves regardless of their nationalities.  They are fully developed artists and are profitable, sustainable entities.  In short, they've made it.

Canadians are proud of our international stars, yet surely, the point of creating CANCON (forcing radio stations to play more Canadian music) was not to merely pad the airplay of international superstars and the profits of U.S. based record companies.

CANCON was constructed around a sound idea.  More radio play for homegrown artists would mean more musicians, more instrument sales, more rehearsal spaces, more recording studios, more managers, more promoters, more labels, more record stores, more fans of Canadian music, etc...

When Shania Twain gets a spin on Canadian radio today, it does none of the above.  CANCON's current formulas are undercutting the very foundation on which it was created
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First of all it needs to be said, the need for Let's Fix CANCON only exists because CANCON was once integral in creating a robust Canadian star system.  We honour CANCON's history and its pioneers.

Our hypothesis is that thanks to the visionaries like Walt Grealis and Stan Klees, forward thinkers at the CRTC, Canadian Heritage, the Canadian Association of Broadcasters among others, we have a problem that other countries envy; we have too many Canadian stars filling up our CANCON!

CANCON was created in the early seventies, a time when most Canadian artists could be considered developing artists. Canada had very few bona fide international stars to speak of, therefore all CANCON airplay was successfully developing Canadian talent somehow, somewhere. There was no need to distinguish developing artists from international megastars.

Then, CANCON worked and assisted in developing Canadian artists.

Today's downside is, as all Canadian radio listeners know, that nearly all CANCON today is the oft repeated airplay of already-developed artists. Today, those who need CANCON rules the least, receive the most.  According to recent studies (PDF), Canadian radio now adds very little independent music to its playlists.  This is the natural progression in the life of CANCON and no one is to blame or at fault.

We must honour the past and get to work on re-focusing CANCON on what we are trying to accomplish as a nation through CANCON, which is the development of Canadian artists and the export of Canadian culture.
» Yes we can, click here to find out how